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As Google’s Growth Falters, Microsoft Could Regain Momentum
By 24/7 Wall St. Wednesday, Apr. 01, 2009People sit under a Google logoitted.
JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty
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Facebook Yahoo! BuzzTwitter Linkedin Permalink Reprints Related Most of the recent news about Google (GOOG) has been bad. Online advertising posted a slow fourth quarter. That unexpectedly included both display ads and search marketing which has made Google one of the fastest growing large companies in America. Several Wall St. analysts have commented that Google’s search revenue’s rate of increase flattened out in January and February. Since the consensus among experts who cover the company is that revenue will rise 11% in the first quarter, a flat quarter would be devastating.

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One of the things that Wall St. hates about Google is that it does one thing better than any other company in the world, but that is all it does. Google Chrome browser, Google Earth, Google Maps, and YouTube have really made much money. Some of the features have not produced any revenue at all. If its search operation falters, Google’s run as the hottest tech company in the world could be over. (See pictures of Google Earth.)

At this point, Google is a $22 billion company. If the search business drops to a growth rate of 10% a year, it will take three years for Google’s sales to get to $30 billion. From the time Microsoft (MSFT) hit $22 billion in sales in 2000, it took the company less than three years to get to the $30 billion plateau. Then from 2002 to 2008, Microsoft’s sales doubled. The software business not only grew. Until recently, it grew quickly. (See pictures of Bill Gates.)

The assumption about Google’s prospects is that the search company is the next Microsoft. Twenty years ago, Microsoft had the hot hand. Sales of Windows and the company’s business and server software were stunning. The margins on some of Microsoft’s software franchises were over 70%. Then the hyper-growth stopped as the company’s market penetration of PCs and servers reached a saturation point. Microsoft’s stock never saw the level it hit in 2000 again. Without lucrative stock options, employees who wanted to make it rich moved to start-ups. The people who had been at the company thirty years were already rich. Many of them retired.

About seven years after Microsoft’s stock hit an all-time high, Google traded at $747, its peak. It now changes hands at $348, and if the company’s sales can only grow at 10% or 15%, the stock is not going back above $700, ever. The myth about companies like Microsoft and Google is that what they do is so important to business and consumers and so pervasive that the growth curve never flattens out. It does flatten at every company. No exceptions.

The press coverage of Google this week included a few pathetic announcements. Disney (DIS) will put some of its premium content on Google’s YouTube. That should be good for $10 million in revenue a year. Google is starting a $100 million venture capital arm which will make it the 1,000th largest venture operation in the world. In other words, it will not be managing enough venture money to matter. Then word came out that Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) might use Google’s operating system in some of its netbooks instead of Microsoft Windows. The important word in that report is “might.” The news that Google is adding thousands of employees a quarter and that the founders have bought a 747 or an aircraft carrier probably hit a high point two years ago.

Saying that Google is doing poorly is not the same as saying that Microsoft is doing well. What matters to Microsoft is that Google becomes less of a threat each day as it fails in its diversification attempts. Google’s cash flow does not continue to give it an almost limitless capital arsenal. Google has to consider cutting people in areas which will never be profitable. The entire ethos at Google is in the process of changing. Microsoft may be in third place in the search business, but it is in first place in software, which is still the larger industry.

Investors still ask Microsoft why it is in the video game business. There is not any reasonable answer. It is an awful business with poor margins. It has nothing to do with selling Windows. There may have been some idea that being in the hardware business would help the software business, but, if so, that idea didn’t work out a long time ago.

With the perceived playing field that Microsoft and Google operate on a bit more level now, they can race after the one market that could be substantial for either one or both of them, which is providing software and search on mobile devices. The smartphone, which is really a PC for the pocket, is part of the one-billion-units-per-year-in-sales handset industry. Providing the operating software and other key components for wireless devices is almost certainly the next big thing for tech companies from Google to Yahoo (YHOO) to Microsoft to Adobe (ADBE). Trying to milk more money out of the PC gets harder and harder. For the largest companies in the industry, it has become a zero sum game. (See pictures of the 50 best websites of 2008.)

For Google and Microsoft, the best days are over, unless one can dominate the handset world the way it did the universe of computers.

— Douglas A. McIntyre
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Report: Semantic Web Companies Are, or Will Soon Begin, Making Money

Written by Marshall Kirkpatrick / October 3, 2008 5:13 PM / 14 Comments


provostpic-1.jpgSemantic Web entrepreneur David Provost has published a report about the state of business in the Semantic Web and it’s a good read for anyone interested in the sector. It’s titled On the Cusp: A Global Review of the Semantic Web Industry. We also mentioned it in our post Where Are All The RDF-based Semantic Web Apps?.

The Semantic Web is a collection of technologies that makes the meaning of content online understandable by machines. After surveying 17 Semantic Web companies, Provost concludes that Semantic science is being productized, differentiated, invested in by mainstream players and increasingly sought after in the business world.

Provost aims to use real-world examples to articulate the value proposition of the Semantic Web in accessible, non-technical language. That there are enough examples available for him to do this is great. His conclusions don’t always seem as well supported by his evidence as he’d like – but the profiles he writes of 17 Semantic Web companies are very interesting to read.

What are these companies doing? Provost writes:

“..some companies are beginning to focus on specific uses of Semantic technology to create solutions in areas like knowledge management, risk management, content management and more. This is a key development in the Semantic Web industry because until fairly recently, most vendors simply sold development tools.”

 

The report surveys companies ranging from the innovative but unlaunched Anzo for Excel from Cambridge Semantics, to well-known big players like Down Jones Client Solutions and RWW sponsor Reuters Calais Initiative, to relatively unknown big players like the already very commercialized Expert System. 10 of the companies were from the US, 6 from Europe and 1 from South Korea.

semwebchart.jpgAbove: Chart from Provost’s report.We’ve been wanting to learn more about “under the radar” but commercialized semantic web companies ever since doing a briefing with Expert System a few months ago. We had never heard of the Italian company before, but they believe they already have they have a richer, deeper semantic index than anyone else online. They told us their database at the time contained 350k English words and 2.8m relationships between them. including geographic representations. They power Microsoft’s spell checker and the Natural Language Processing (NLP) in the Blackberry. They also sell NLP software to the US military and Department of Homeland Security, which didn’t seem like anything to brag about to us but presumably makes up a significant part of the $12 million+ in revenue they told Provost they made last year.

And some people say the Semantic Web only exists inside the laboratories of Web 3.0 eggheads!

Shortcomings of the Report

Provost writes that “the vendors [in] this report have all the appearances of thriving, emerging technology companies and they have shown their readiness to cross borders, continents, and oceans to reach customers.” You’d think they turned water into wine. Those are strong words for a study in which only 4 of 17 companies were willing to report their revenue and several hadn’t launched products yet.

The logic here is sometimes pretty amazing.

The above examples [there were two discussed – RWW] are just a brief sampling of the commercial success that the Semantic Web has been experiencing. In broad terms, it’s easy to point out the longevity of many companies in this industry and use that as a proxy for commercial success [wow – RWW]. With more time (and space in this report), additional examples could be described but the most interesting prospect pertains to what the industry landscape will look like in twelve months. [hmmm…-RWW]

 

In fact, while Provost has glowingly positive things to about all the companies he surveyed, the absence of engagement with any of their shortcomings makes the report read more like marketing material than any objective take on what’s supposed to be world-changing technology.

This is a Fun Read

The fact is, though, that Provost writes a great introduction to many companies working to sell software in a field still too widely believed to be ephemeral. The stories of each of the 17 companies profiled are fun to read and many of Provost’s points of analysis are both intuitive and thought provoking.

He says the sector is “on the cusp” of major penetration into existing markets currently served by non-semantic software. Provost argues that the Semantic Web struggles to explain itself because the World Wide Web is so intensely visual and semantics are not. He says that reselling business partners in specific distribution channels are combining their domain knowledge with the science of the software developers to bring these tools to market. He tells a great, if unattributed, story about what Linked Data could mean to the banking industry.

We hadn’t heard of several of the companies profiled in the report, and a handful of them had never been mentioned by the 34 semantic web specialist blogs we track, either.

There’s something here for everyone. You can read the full report here.

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The Semantic Desktop? SDS Brings Semantics To Excel

Written by Sarah Perez / August 13, 2008 6:30 AM / 6 Comments


When you hear the word “semantic” you likely think of the semantic web – the supposed next iteration of the World Wide Web that features structured data and specific protocols that aim to bring about an “intelligent” web. But the concept of semantics doesn’t necessarily apply just to the web – it can apply to other things as well, like your desktop…or even your Excel spreadsheets, according to Ian Goldsmid, founder of Semantic Business Intelligence, whose new app, SDS, brings a semantic system to spreadsheets.

Semantic Spreadsheets

The problem with spreadsheets that their system is trying to address has to do with those who need to derive data from multiple spreadsheets (two or more). Although it’s easy enough to perform sorts, build macros, and create formulas within one spreadsheet, when needing to compare values in multiple spreadsheets the process becomes more difficult.

The company’s app, The Semantic Discovery System for Excel, or just SDS for short, will look for similar columns or rows between the sheets and then “semantically” connects them. They don’t appear to just be throwing that term around either – the app uses the same W3C Semantic Web technologies (RDF, OWL, SPARQL) to help you capture “meaning, intelligence, and knowledge” from the data saved in your spreadsheets.

Do We Need Semantic Desktop Apps?

Does SDS solve a business problem that is not yet being addressed through current technologies? In my experience, the short answer to this question is “no.” (But wait, there’s more…)

Typically, when a business has need of comparing and analyzing large amounts of data, the solution is to turn to a database product that can then be queried and from which custom reports can be pulled. And a business doesn’t need to spend a lot of money on a robust solution to do so – even a smaller business can create a database by using inexpensive desktop software.

However, the difference between using a database technology and “semantically connecting” some spreadsheets comes down to for whom this product is being built. In the past, databases and other business intelligence apps were built as if the creators knew that the only person using them would be an I.T. guy or gal. SDS, instead, aims to satisfy the needs of the non-technical end user.

Is this another example of tech populism at work? It certainly looks like it. Yet, in this case their market is small – a non-technical user who’s also a power user with Excel? There’s usually some overlap there. Not to mention, by the time you’ve achieved “power user” status, you’ve often also figured out how to do more complicated things in Excel…like, say, formulas that work across spreadsheets, for example – the very pain points this app is trying to address.

Still, it’s an interesting concept to think of taking the semantic web capabilities and integrating them into everyday programs to add a layer of intelligence to these programs as well. Done correctly, it could improve the capabilities of our favorite software apps without making the programs overly complex, which is what typically happens when you add more features.

What do you think? Is the Semantic Desktop (that is, semantically-enabled desktop apps) right around the corner? Or is this product and those like it too niche to find an audience? Let us know what you think in the comments.

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Google: “We’re Not Doing a Good Job with Structured Data”

Written by Sarah Perez / February 2, 2009 7:32 AM / 9 Comments


During a talk at the New England Database Day conference at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Google’s Alon Halevy admitted that the search giant has “not been doing a good job” presenting the structured data found on the web to its users. By “structured data,” Halevy was referring to the databases of the “deep web” – those internet resources that sit behind forms and site-specific search boxes, unable to be indexed through passive means.

Google’s Deep Web Search

Halevy, who heads the “Deep Web” search initiative at Google, described the “Shallow Web” as containing about 5 million web pages while the “Deep Web” is estimated to be 500 times the size. This hidden web is currently being indexed in part by Google’s automated systems that submit queries to various databases, retrieving the content found for indexing. In addition to that aspect of the Deep Web – dubbed “vertical searching” – Halevy also referenced two other types of Deep Web Search: semantic search and product search.

Google wants to also be able to retrieve the data found in structured tables on the web, said Halevy, citing a table on a page listing the U.S. presidents as an example. There are 14 billion such tables on the web, and, after filtering, about 154 million of them are interesting enough to be worth indexing.

Can Google Dig into the Deep Web?

The question that remains is whether or not Google’s current search engine technology is going to be adept at doing all the different types of Deep Web indexing or if they will need to come up with something new. As of now, Google uses the Big Table database and MapReduce framework for everything search related, notes Alex Esterkin, Chief Architect at Infobright, Inc., a company delivering open source data warehousing solutions. During the talk, Halevy listed a number of analytical database application challenges that Google is currently dealing with: schema auto-complete, synonym discovery, creating entity lists, association between instances and aspects, and data level synonyms discovery. These challenges are addressed by Infobright’s technology, said Esterkin, but “Google will have to solve these problems the hard way.”

Also mentioned during the speech was how Google plans to organize “aspects” of search queries. The company wants to be able to separate exploratory queries (e.g., “Vietnam travel”) from ones where a user is in search of a particular fact (“Vietnam population”). The former query should deliver information about visa requirements, weather and tour packages, etc. In a way, this is like what the search service offered by Kosmix is doing. But Google wants to go further, said Halevy. “Kosmix will give you an ‘aspect,’ but it’s attached to an information source. In our case, all the aspects might be just Web search results, but we’d organize them differently.”

Yahoo Working on Similar Structured Data Retrieval

The challenges facing Google today are also being addressed by their nearest competitor in search, Yahoo. In December, Yahoo announced that they were taking their SearchMonkey technology in-house to automate the extraction of structured information from large classes of web sites. The results of that in-house extraction technique will allow Yahoo to augment their Yahoo Search results with key information returned alongside the URLs.

In this aspect of web search, it’s clear that no single company has yet to dominate. However, even if a non-Google company surges ahead, it may not be enough to get people to switch engines. Today, “Google” has become synonymous with web search, just like “Kleenex” is a tissue, “Band-Aid” is an adhesive bandage, and “Xerox” is a way to make photocopies. Once that psychological mark has been made into our collective psyches and the habit formed, people tend to stick with what they know, regardless of who does it better. That’s something that’s a bit troublesome – if better search technology for indexing the Deep Web comes into existence outside of Google, the world may not end up using it until such point Google either duplicates or acquires the invention.

Still, it’s far too soon to write Google off yet. They clearly have a lead when it comes to search and that came from hard work, incredibly smart people, and innovative technical achievements. No doubt they can figure out this Deep Web thing, too. (We hope).

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Yahoo to Enable Custom Semantic Search Engines

Written by Marshall Kirkpatrick / February 11, 2009 9:14 AM / 2 Comments


Yahoo is bringing together two of its most interesting projects today, Yahoo BOSS (Build Your Own Search Service) and SearchMonkey, its semantic indexing and search result enhancement service. There were a number of different parts of the announcement – but the core of the story is simple.

Developers will now be able to build their own search engines using the Yahoo! index and search processing infrastructure via BOSS and include the semantic markup added to pages in both results parsing and the display of those results. There’s considerable potential here for some really dazzling results.

We wrote about the genesis of Search Monkey here this Spring, it’s an incredibly ambitious project. The end result of it is rich search results, where additional dynamic data from marked up fields can also be displayed on the search results page itself. So searching for a movie will show not just web pages associated with that movie, but additional details from those pages, like movie ratings, stars, etc. There’s all kinds of possibilities for all kinds of data.

Is anyone using Yahoo! BOSS yet? Anyone who will be able to leverage Search Monkey for a better experience right away? Yahoo is encouraging developers to tag their projects bossmashup in Delicious. As you can see for yourself, there are a number of interesting proofs of concept there but not a whole lot of products. Of the products that are there, very few seem terribly compelling to us so far.

We must admit that the most compelling BOSS implementation so far is over at the site of our competitors TechCrunch. Their new blog network search implementation of BOSS is beautiful – you can see easily, for example, that TechCrunch network blogs have used the word ReadWriteWeb 7 times in the last 6 months. (In case you were wondering.)

Speaking of TechCrunch, that site’s Mark Hendrickson covered the Yahoo BOSS/Search Monkey announcement today as well, and having worked closely on the implementation there he’s got an interesting perspective on it. He points out that the new pricing model, free up to 10,000 queries a day, will likely only impact a handful of big sites – not BOSS add-ons like TechCrunch search or smaller projects.

The other interesting part of the announcement is that BOSS developers will now be allowed to use 3rd party ads on their pages leveraging BOSS – not just Yahoo adds. That’s hopeful.

Can Yahoo do it? Can these two projects brought together lead to awesome search mashups all over the web? We’ve had very high hopes in the past. Now the proof will be in the pudding.

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2009 Predictions and Recommendations for Web 2.0 and Social Networks

Christopher Rollyson

Volatility, Uncertainly and Opportunity—Move Crisply while Competitors Are in Disarray

Now that the Year in Review 2008 has summarized key trends, we are in excellent position for 2009 prognostications, so welcome to Part II. As all experienced executives know, risk and reward are inseparable twins, and periods of disruption elevate both, so you will have much more opportunity to produce uncommon value than normal.

This is a high-stakes year in which we can expect surprises. Web 2.0 and social networks can help because they increase flexibility and adaptiveness. Alas, those who succeed will have to challenge conventional thinking considerably, which is not a trivial exercise in normal times. The volatility that many businesses face will make it more difficult because many of their clients and/or employees will be distracted. It will also make it easier because some of them will perceive that extensive change is afoot, and Web 2.0 will blend in with the cacaphony. Disruption produces unusual changes in markets, and the people that perceive the new patterns and react appropriately emerge as new leaders.

2009 Predictions

These are too diverse to be ranked in any particular order. Please share your reactions and contribute those that I have missed.

  1. The global financial crisis will continue to add significant uncertainty in the global economy in 2009 and probably beyond. I have no scientific basis for this, but there are excellent experts of every flavor on the subject, so take your pick. I believe that we are off the map, and anyone who says that he’s sure of a certain outcome should be considered with a healthy skepticism.
    • All I can say is my friends, clients and sources in investment and commercial banking tell me it’s not over yet, and uncertainty is the only certainty until further notice. This has not yet been fully leeched.
    • Western governments, led the the U.S., are probably prolonging the pain because governments usually get bailouts wrong. However, voters don’t have the stomachs for hardship, so we are probably trading short-term “feel good” efforts for a prolonged adjustment period.
  2. Widespread social media success stories in 2009 in the most easily measurable areas such as talent management, business development, R&D and marketing.
    • 2008 saw a significant increase in enterprise executives’ experimentation with LinkedIn, Facebook, YouTube and enterprise (internal) social networks. These will begin to bear fruit in 2009, after which a “mad rush of adoption” will ensue.
    • People who delay adoption will pay dearly in terms of consulting fees, delayed staff training and retarded results.
  3. Internal social networks will largely disappoint. Similar to intranets, they will produce value, but few enterprises are viable long-term without seamlessly engaging the burgeoning external world of experts.
    In general, the larger and more disparate an organization’s audience
    is, the more value it can create, but culture must encourage emergent, cross-boundary connections, which is where many organizations fall down.

 

  • If you’re a CIO who’s banking heavily on your behind-the-firewall implementation, just be aware that you need to engage externally as well.
  • Do it fast because education takes longer than you think.
  • There are always more smart people outside than inside any organization.
  • Significant consolidation among white label social network vendors, so use your usual customary caution when signing up partners.
    • Due diligence and skill portability will help you to mitigate risks. Any vendor worth their salt will use standardized SOA-friendly architecture and feature sets. As I wrote last year, Web 2.0 is not your father’s software, so focus on people and process more than technology.
    • If your vendor hopeful imposes process on your people, run.
  • No extensive M&A among big branded sites like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter although there will probably be some. The concept of the social ecosystem holds that nodes on pervasive networks can add value individually. LinkedIn and Facebook have completely different social contexts. “Traditional” executives tend to view disruptions as “the new thing” that they want to put into a bucket (”let them all buy each other, so I only have to learn one!”). Wrong. This is the new human nervous system, and online social venues, like their offline counterparts, want specificity because they add more value that way. People hack together the networks to which they belong based on their goals and interests.
    • LinkedIn is very focused on the executive environment, and they will not buy Facebook or Twitter. They might buy a smaller company. They are focused on building an executive collaboration platform, and a large acquisition would threaten their focus. LinkedIn is in the initial part of its value curve, they have significant cash, and they’re profitable. Their VCs can smell big money down the road, so they won’t sell this year.
    • Twitter already turned down Facebook, and my conversations with them lead me to believe that they love their company; and its value is largely undiscovered as of yet. They will hold out as long as they can.
    • Facebook has staying power past 2009. They don’t need to buy anyone of import; they are gaining global market share at a fast clip. They already enable customers to build a large part of the Facebook experience, and they have significant room to innovate. Yes, there is a backlash in some quarters against their size. I don’t know Mark Zuckerberg personally, and I don’t have a feeling for his personal goals.
    • I was sad to see that Dow Jones sold out to NewsCorp and, as a long-time Wall Street Journal subscriber, I am even more dismayed now. This will prove a quintessential example of value destruction. The Financial Times currently fields a much better offering. The WSJ is beginning to look like MySpace! As for MySpace itself, I don’t have a firm bead on it but surmise that it has a higher probability of major M&A than the aforementioned: its growth has stalled, Facebook continues to gain, and Facebook uses more Web 2.0 processes, so I believe it will surpass MySpace in terms of global audience.
    • In being completely dominant, Google is the Wal-Mart of Web 2.0, and I don’t have much visibility into their plans, but I think they could make significant waves in 2009. They are very focused on applying search innovation to video, which is still in the initial stages of adoption, so YouTube is not going anywhere.
    • I am less familiar with Digg, Xing, Bebo, Cyworld. Of course, Orkut is part of the Googleverse.
  • Significant social media use by the Obama Administration. It has the knowledge, experience and support base to pursue fairly radical change. Moreover, the degree of change will be in synch with the economy: if there is a significant worsening, expect the government to engage people to do uncommon things.
    • Change.gov is the first phase in which supporters or any interested person is invited to contribute thoughts, stories and documents to the transition team. It aims to keep people engaged and to serve the government on a volunteer basis
    • The old way of doing things was to hand out form letters that you would mail to your representative. Using Web 2.0, people can organize almost instantly, and results are visible in real-time. Since people are increasingly online somewhere, the Administration will invite them from within their favorite venue (MySpace, Facebook…).
    • Obama has learned that volunteering provides people with a sense of meaning and importance. Many volunteers become evangelists.
  • Increasing citizen activism against companies and agencies, a disquieting prospect but one that I would not omit from your scenario planning (ask yourself, “How could people come together and magnify some of our blemishes?” more here). To whit:
    • In 2007, an electronic petition opposing pay-per-use road tolls in the UK reached 1.8 million signatories, stalling a major government initiative. Although this did not primarily employ social media, it is indicative of the phenomenon.
    • In Q4 2008, numerous citizen groups organized Facebook groups (25,000 signatures in a very short time) to oppose television and radio taxes, alarming the Swiss government. Citizens are organizing to stop paying obligatory taxes—and to abolish the agency that administers the tax system. Another citizen initiative recently launched on the Internet collected 60,000 signatures to oppose biometric passports. German links. French links.
    • In the most audacious case, Ahmed Maher is using Facebook to try to topple the government of Egypt. According to Wired’s Cairo Activists Use Facebook to Rattle Regime, activists have organized several large demonstrations and have a Facebook group of 70,000 that’s growing fast.
  • Executive employment will continue to feel pressure, and job searches will get increasingly difficult for many, especially those with “traditional” jobs that depend on Industrial Economy organization.
    • In tandem with this, there will be more opportunities for people who can “free-agent” themselves in some form.
    • In 2009, an increasing portion of executives will have success at using social networks to diminish their business development costs, and their lead will subsequently accelerate the leeching of enterprises’ best and brightest, many of whom could have more flexibility and better pay as independents. This is already manifest as displaced executives choose never to go back.
    • The enterprise will continue to unbundle. I have covered this extensively on the Transourcing website.
  • Enterprise clients will start asking for “strategy” to synchronize social media initiatives. Web 2.0 is following the classic adoption pattern: thus far, most enterprises have been using a skunk works approach to their social media initiatives, or they’ve been paying their agencies to learn while delivering services.
    • In the next phase, beginning in 2009, CMOs, CTOs and CIOs will sponsor enterprise level initiatives, which will kick off executive learning and begin enterprise development of social media native skills. After 1-2 years of this, social media will be spearheaded by VPs and directors.
    • Professional services firms (PwC, KPMG, Deloitte..) will begin scrambling to pull together advisory practices after several of their clients ask for strategy help. These firms’ high costs do not permit them to build significantly ahead of demand.
    • Marketing and ad agencies (Leo Burnett, Digitas…) will also be asked for strategy help, but they will be hampered by their desires to maintain the outsourced model; social media is not marketing, even though it will displace certain types of marketing.
    • Strategy houses (McKinsey, BCG, Booz Allen…) will also be confronted by clients asking for social media strategy; their issue will be that it is difficult to quantify, and the implementation piece is not in their comfort zone, reducing revenue per client.
    • Boutiques will emerge to develop seamless strategy and implementation for social networks. This is needed because Web 2.0 and social networks programs involve strategy, but implementation involves little technology when compared to Web 1.0. As I’ll discuss in an imminent article, it will involve much more interpersonal mentoring and program development.
  • Corporate spending on Enterprise 2.0 will be very conservative, and pureplay and white label vendors (and consultants) will need to have strong business cases.
    • CIOs have better things to spend money on, and they are usually reacting to business unit executives who are still getting their arms around the value of Web 2.0, social networks and social media.
    • Enterprise software vendors will release significant Web 2.0 bolt-on improvements to their platforms in 2009. IBM is arguably out in front with Lotus Connections, with Microsoft Sharepoint fielding a solid solution. SAP and Oracle will field more robust solutions this year.
  • The financial crunch will accelerate social network adoption among those focused on substance rather than flash; this is akin to the dotbomb from 2001-2004, no one wanted to do the Web as an end in itself anymore; it flushed out the fluffy offers (and well as some really good ones).
    • Social media can save money.. how much did it cost the Obama campaign in time and money to raise $500 million? Extremely little.
    • People like to get involved and contribute, when you can frame the activity as important and you provide the tools to facilitate meaningful action. Engagement raises profits and can decrease costs. Engaged customers, for example, tend to leave less often than apathetic customers.
    • Social media is usually about engaging volunteer contributors; if you get it right, you will get a lot of help for little cash outlay.
    • Social media presents many new possibilities for revenue, but to see them, look outside existing product silos. Focus on customer experience by engaging customers, not with your organization, but with each other. Customer-customer communication is excellent for learning about experience.
  • Microblogging will completely mainstream even though Twitter is still quite emergent and few solid business cases exist.
    • Twitter (also Plurk, Jaiku, Pownce {just bought by Six Apart and closed}, Kwippy, Tumblr) are unique for two reasons: they incorporate mobility seamlessly, and they chunk communications small; this leads to a great diversity of “usage context”
    • Note that Dell sold $1 million on Twitter in 2008, using it as a channel for existing business.
    • In many businesses, customers will begin expecting your organization to be on Twitter; this year it will rapidly cease to be a novelty.

    2009 Recommendations

    Web 2.0 will affect business and culture far more than Web 1.0 (the internet), which was about real-time information access and transactions via a standards-based network and interface. Web 2.0 enables real-time knowledge and relationships, so it will profoundly affect most organizations’ stakeholders (clients, customers, regulators, employees, directors, investors, the public…). It will change how all types of buying decisions are made.

    As an individual and/or an organization leader, you have the opportunity to adopt more quickly than your peers and increase your relevance to stakeholders as their Web 2.0 expectations of you increase. 2009 will be a year of significant adoption, and I have kept this list short, general and actionable. I have assumed that your organization has been experimenting with various aspects of Web 2.0, that some people have moderate experience. Please feel free to contact me if you would like more specific or advanced information or suggestions. Recommendations are ranked in importance, the most critical at the top.

    1. What: Audit your organization’s Web 2.0 ecosystem, and conduct your readiness assessment. Why: Do this to act with purpose, mature your efforts past experimentation and increase your returns on investment.
      • The ecosystem audit will tell you what stakeholders are doing, and in what venues. Moreover, a good one will tell you trends, not just numbers. In times of rapid adoption, knowing trends is critical, so you can predict the future. Here’s more about audits.
      • The readiness assessment will help you to understand how your value proposition and resources align with creating and maintaining online relationships. The audit has told you what stakeholders are doing, now you need to assess what you can do to engage them on an ongoing basis. Here’s more about readiness assessments.
    2. What: Select a top executive to lead your organization’s adoption of Web 2.0 and social networks. Why: Web 2.0 is changing how people interact, and your organizational competence will be affected considerably, so applying it to your career and business is very important.
      • This CxO should be someone with a track record for innovation and a commitment to leading discontinuous change. Should be philosophically in synch with the idea of emergent organization and cross-boundary collaboration.
      • S/He will coordinate your creation of strategy and programs (part-time). This includes formalizing your Web 2.0 policy, legal and security due diligence.
    3. What: Use an iterative portfolio approach to pursue social media initiatives in several areas of your business, and chunk investments small.
      Why: Both iteration and portfolio approaches help you to manage risk and increase returns.
    • Use the results of the audit and the readiness assessment to help you to select the stakeholders you want to engage.
    • Engage a critical mass of stakeholders about things that inspire or irritate them and that you can help them with.
    • All else equal, pilots should include several types of Web 2.0 venues and modes like blogs, big branded networks (Facebook, MySpace), microblogs (Twitter), video and audio.
    • As a general rule, extensive opportunity exists where you can use social media to cross boundaries, which usually impose high costs and prevent collaboration. One of the most interesting in 2009 will be encouraging alumni, employees and recruits to connect and collaborate according to their specific business interests. This can significantly reduce your organization’s business development, sales and talent acquisition costs. For more insight to this, see Alumni 2.0.
    • Don’t overlook pilots with multiple returns, like profile management programs, which can reduce your talent acquisition and business development costs. Here’s more on profile management.

     

  • What: Create a Web 2.0 community with numerous roles to enable employees flexibility.
    Why: You want to keep investments small and let the most motivated employees step forward.

    • Roles should include volunteers for pilots, mentors (resident bloggers, video producers and others), community builders (rapidly codify the knowledge you are gathering from pilots), some part-time more formal roles. Perhaps a full-time person to coordinate would make sense. Roles can be progressive and intermittent. Think of this as open source.
    • To stimulate involvement, the program must be meaningful, and it must be structured to minimize conflicts with other responsibilities.
  • What: Avoid the proclivity to treat Web 2.0 as a technology initiative. Why: Web 1.0 (the Internet) involved more of IT than does Web 2.0, and many people are conditioned to think that IT drives innovation; they fall in the tech trap, select tools first and impose process. This is old school and unnecessary because the tools are far more flexible than the last generation software with which many are still familiar.
    • People create the value when they get involved, and technology often gets in the way by making investments in tools that impose process on people and turn them off. Web 2.0 tools impose far less process on people.
    • More important than what brand you invest in is your focus on social network processes and how they add value to existing business processes. If you adopt smartly, you will be able to transfer assets and processes elsewhere while minimizing disruption. More likely is that some brands will disappear (Pownce closed its doors 15 December). When you focus your organization on mastering process and you distribute learning, you will be more flexible with the tools.
    • Focus on process and people, and incent people to gather and share knowledge and help each other. This will increase your flexibility with tools.
  • What: Manage consulting, marketing and technology partners with a portfolio strategy. Why: Maximize flexibility and minimize risk.
    • From the technology point of view, there are three main vendor flavors: enterprise bolt-on (i.e. Lotus Connections), pureplay white label vendors (SmallWorldLabs) and open (Facebook, LinkedIn). As a group, pureplays have the most diversity in terms of business models, and the most uncertainty. Enterprise bolt-ons’ biggest risk is that they lag significantly behind. More comparisons here.
    • Fight the urge to go with one. If you’re serious about getting business value, you need to be in the open cross-boundary networks. If you have a Lotus or Microsoft relationship, compare Connections and Sharepoint with some pureplays to address private social network needs. An excellent way to start could be with Yammer.
    • Be careful when working with consulting- and marketing-oriented partners who are accustomed to an outsourced model. Web 2.0 is not marketing; it is communicating to form relationships and collaborate online. It does have extensive marketing applications; make sure partners have demonstrated processes for mentoring because Web 2.0 will be a core capability for knowledge-based organizations, and you need to build your resident knowledge.
  • Parting Shots

    I hope you find these thoughts useful, and I encourage you to add your insights and reactions as comments. If you have additional questions about how to use Web 2.0, please feel free to contact me. I wish all the best to you in 2009.

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