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Archive for January 15th, 2008

Sergey Lourie

PhD, expert at Russian State Corporation of Nanotechnologies

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I’d like to mention also that there were other networks (we could also recall BBS’ in the modem age, I was 14 at the moment) that were pushed away by the growing and evolving internet society. I think that it’s the simplicity of tag usage and superiour flexibility of HTML language invented by CERN employee that was behind the explosive boom of internet. And this boom, in turn, indicated the need for other protocols that developed later.
As for evolution of internet itself, 15 years ago we could communicate only with text messages, now audio and video conferences are not uncommon. This evolution, however, wouldn’t be possible without the prior and parallel evolution of IT.
It may seem that evolution of internet has slowed down – now it’s too hard to find ways to communicate other than text, audio and video. Maybe think about tactile/action feedback that could be used for new interfaces – the imperfect contemporary Wii does that today and what can such interfaces evolve to in future? Or maybe invent a way of sending the flavours and smells in order to complete the full gamma of senses available to humans? – That’s what could be used for future meta-internet, I think.
As for the people, which are usually the greatest asset of any successful company, some brilliant folks can’t leave their household due to being disabled. Think of Steve Hawkins, for example. And there are many others for whom internet is the only way to reach out.
With the growing perfection of communicative environment such folks can be more and more productive. And in commercial way, too.

Clarification added 3 minutes ago:

Stephen Hawkins (I hope I spelled his name right) – astrophysicist from USA, Nobel prise winner

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remmolt zwartsenberg

Owner, several and Computer Networking Consultant

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The internet, being an evolution of ARPANET, was designed as a communication platform that would keep on running when radio-networks would be blacked out by electromagnetic shockwaves caused by nuclear detonations. (EMP). Now that in 2008 it is finally living up to that functionality, mankind (and womankind?) finds that we wind up with higher power bills and less quality time with our friends, families, volunteer communities etc. Some careful usage statistics and logging analysis indicates that anywhere among 1,5 and 2 billion people are concurrently online on this little bright blue ball we call Planet Earth.

Internet is a medium in blossom, but hmm, we DID see some huge spiders weaving & crawling the WorldWideWeb 😉 Our sons are online on average 10 hours per day, if we let them. Will typically forget about the ‘real’ world and the practice of ‘simple’ skills like cooking a healthy meal for say, 5-9 people. And, no, still can’t not explain to my old mother (now 83) what benefits SHE would reap from getting connected and online.

Is there any 1 out there that has a clue where we are going from here?

-Remmolt

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Shariff Masood

Senior IT Professional

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Best Answers in: Planning (1)

My two cents –

Get the government out of this business! Let Free Enterprise rule!

Get BroadBand to every one or something better!

All else will follow!

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 http://primavera.fee.uva.nl/PDFdocs/2007-05.pdf

 

PrimaVera Working Paper Series

PrimaVera Working Paper 2006-10

Identity management distilled

a comparison of frameworks

Pieter Wisse and Paul Jansen

May 2006

Category: scientific

University of Amsterdam

Department of Information Management

Roetersstraat 11

1018 WB Amsterdam

http://primavera.fee.uva.nl

Copyright ©2006 by the Universiteit van Amsterdam

All rights reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic of mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the authors. Identity management distilled

Identity management distilled

a comparison of frameworks

Abstract

Compelling reasons abound today for emphasizing the relevance of identity management. Enabled by digital information — including communication — technology, people conduct an increasing number of their interactions physically separated in space, yet connected in ‘real time.’ And ‘machines,’ especially so-called agents, are making their online contributions by proxy. But then, it’s not only the actors directly involved in interaction whose identities should be managed proportionally. Application of information as the very medium of interaction always entails — an attempt, at least, at — object references, qualified in relevant ways. Indeed, more identities to manage.

At this early stage of — digital — identity management, we choose to refrain from any tight definition. It’s simply too early. Instead, in this working paper we juxtapose and comment upon several frameworks, all proposed for information management where the concept of identity

plays a key part. From such a comparison, an already clearer overview emerges of the varieties of identity management.

Keywords

Identity management, information management.

About the authors

Pieter E. Wisse (http://www.wisse.cc) is the founder and president of Information Dynamics, an independent company operating from the Netherlands and involved in research & development of complex information systems. He holds an engineering degree (mathematics and information management) from Delft University of Technology and a PhD (information management) from the University of Amsterdam. At the latter university, Pieter is affiliated with the PrimaVera research program in information management.

Paul L. Jansen (http://www.pibuckle.com

) majored in human resources development at Trinity University, respectively Boston University. His PhD in social & behavioral sciences is from Illinois University. Paul works as a change agent, with a special passion for empowering people to create their learning organization. He has worked for varying organizations, including his own consultancy company.

2 Identity management distilled

3 Identity management distilled

Introduction

We start from our own iDNA-Manifesto.1 For each article in our manifesto, we’re going to discuss how other frameworks have covered the same or similar questions. After we’ve dealt in depth with all fifteen of our own manifesto’s articles, one section at a time, in three additional sections we’ll quickly go over each of the other frameworks to see what we may have missed, there. Did we overlook anything of relevance with iDNA-Manifesto? We thereby take the additional opportunity to explain our preferences.

The other three frameworks dealing with identity management in some important way(s) and treated here, are:

— The Laws of Identity,2 edited by Microsoft’s Kim Cameron3

 

— Privacy and Identity Management for Europe (PRIME),4 prepared by a consortium for the European Community plus Switzerland

 

— E-Citizen Charter,5 some guidelines for citizen-oriented government services in the Netherlands.

We do not pretend to present an exhaustive inventory, at all.6 However, we do believe that these frameworks are now representative for the growing attention given to identity management, whatever it will come to mean.7

 

29

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http://primavera.fee.uva.nl/PDFdocs/2006-10.pdf  

 

PrimaVera Working Paper Series

PrimaVera Working Paper 2007-05

Ontology for interdependency:

steps to an ecology of information management

Pieter Wisse

March 2007

Category: academic

University of Amsterdam

Department of Information Management

Roetersstraat 11

1018 WB Amsterdam

http://primavera.fee.uva.nl

Copyright 2007 by the Universiteit van Amsterdam

All rights reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic of mechanical, including

photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the authors.

Ontology for interdependency: steps to an ecology of information management

2

Ontology for interdependency:

steps to an ecology of information management

Pieter Wisse

Abstract:

There’s no lack of visionaries referring to the information society. Any vision may be considered a

highly abstract design. Often to the dismay of its proponents, a particular vision’s credibility, if not

outright proof, ultimately depends largely on most practical, mundane engineering. Can it be made to

actually work? Is the information infrastructure at all feasible to reliably, readily implement it?

This paper presents as a direction for information management to widen its scope of rigorous

relevance. An ontology is sketched for unambiguously capturing limitless behavioral variety. It

requires shifting the grounding perspective to interdependency.

Keywords:

Information management, ontology, interdependency, metapattern, behavioral variety, semantics,

realism, semiotics, semiotic ennead.

About the author:

Pieter E. Wisse (http://www.wisse.cc) is founder and president of Information Dynamics, an independent company

operating from the Netherlands and involved in research & development of complex, civil information

management.

Pieter holds an engineering degree (mathematics and information management) from Delft University of

Technology and a PhD (information management) from the University of Amsterdam where he is now affiliated

with PrimaVera as a research fellow. He regularly contributes working papers to the PrimaVera series.

Ontology for interdependency: steps to an ecology of information management

3

The trend towards ever increasing interconnectivity is unmistakable. Still severely lacking, though, is

the recognition in the first place of the need for controlled balance at the emerging global scale of

information management. With even an awareness missing, how can such balance ever be achieved?

How can especially legitimate demands for security, for authorization, auditability, etcetera be met

under qualitatively new conditions of open interconnectivity?

Information management must timely — which is now! — develop from some narrow discipline

supporting separate business and government organizations to an essentially interdisciplinary approach

covering the whole range of social interaction. A predominantly technical orientation such as

interconnectivity doesn’t do proper justice to the social variety that needs to be engaged by newly

balanced policy, etcetera. What is needed is a framework through which up to an individual citizen’s

differences are recognized as constitutive for a dynamic open society. Sufficient formalism should

guarantee both relevance and rigor. For that purpose, an ontology for interdependency is

indispensable.

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Jan van Til

Informatiekundig ontwerper at Gasunie

see all my answers

Best Answers in: Internationalization and Localization (1)

A rather radical way to develop Internet is to focus on the way we treat Personal Information. If we would radically treat Personal Information as Personal Property… and if we would understand and appreciate the consequences of it as outlined in the “i Charter” (see: http://www.dotindividual.com/doticharter.htm) and further explained on Primavera (University of Amsterdam): http://primavera.fee.uva.nl/PDFdocs/2006-10.pdf (please note: “iDNA-Manifesto” is synonymous with “i Charter”)… then the character of Internet would radically change because the way we deal with information – our own Personal Information and Personal Information of other Persons – radically changes. Please, do ponder that for (quite) a while.
There is much, much more to say on this broad subject, but I will leave it to mentioning the next url to you: http://primavera.fee.uva.nl/PDFdocs/2007-05.pdf. In this article an ontology is sketched for unambiguously capturing limitless behavioural variety.

http://www.dotindividual.com/doticharter.htm 

General
1.      Information about the individual (legal) person1 is the property of that (legal) person2.

Delegation of usage rights
2.      The person may grant other parties usage rights to their person information.
3.
      The person stipulates a usage right, e.g. authorisation, by specifying at least a. the other party; b. the purpose of usage and; c. the relevant subset of person information3.
4.
      A usage right may include that the other party keeps a register of – a duplicate of, irrespective of the medium – person information.
5.
      All granted usage rights become inextricably part of person information.
6.      A government institution obtains usage rights by law4.

Accountability of usage
7.      No additional permission is required for the person to inspect the usage, when applicable including how registers are kept, of their person information by the other party.
8.
      The other party periodically, without the person’s explicit request and for each transaction, accounts for the usage of their person information to the person in question. The reporting frequency has been determined in the usage agreement.
9.
      If the other party (also) keeps a register for the person information, an account must be included in the periodic report to the person. The reporting period has also been determined in the usage agreement.
10.
  How a government institution accounts for usage of person information is decreed by law.

Quality
11.  The person is responsible for the quality of information subject to usage agreement(s).
12.
  Upon receiving a signal by any other party of faulty person information, the person immediately applies correction.

Trusted (third) parties
13.  The person’s control over their person information may be restricted. Any restriction always has a legal basis4.
14.
  The person designates a trusted party for controlling their restricted person information. The trusted party has been formally certified for its intermediary role (reflecting the requirement trust in social trans-/interactions)5.
15.
  Upon formal declaration of the person’s contractual incapacity, rights and duties concerning their person information, too, fall to their legal representative(s).

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Jim Jordan

Technology Consultant at Starfish Retentions Solutions

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Best Answers in: Business Development (1)see more, Business Analytics (1) see less

This was selected as Best Answer

I think you do have it Francisco, Silicon Valley is about the synergy of the people, but just as cloud computing is becoming real with the internet, cloud innovation, with people networking and innovating without the need to have a whiteboard in the room with them, is the next step.

This really isn’t a meta-internet, it’s simply an extension of the functionality that’s already there. Be prepared for completely virtual teams.

An interesting question then is what are the personality types that will function best in this virtual environment? Will it be the same type who work well in an office? I rather think not. There’s a need to be able to have a virtual meeting of minds, and create synergies with other people who you only know through your online environment.

I’m in, essentially, a completely virtual company right now. It’s an interesting experiment in pulling off projects when you pretty much never meet the other folks on the team.

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